Seeing Stars – free on Amazon July 21 and 22

Free July 21 and 22 - Click to get your copy!

I’m excited to announce that my book, Seeing Stars is now available as an ebook!  As a thank you to my readers, I’ve arranged for Seeing Stars to be offered free on Amazon July 21 and 22 (this Saturday and Sunday). Click on the “Buy” link Saturday or Sunday, the price is FREE! Download your free copy and take a journey with mountaintop astronomer Claire Welland, who is anything but starry-eyed, and the man she remembers as the bad boy from her high school days.

Seeing Stars

Arizona astronomer Claire Welland is anything but starry-eyed when it comes to romance. She knows her home on an isolated mountaintop observatory makes marriage to most men impossible, but that doesn’t mean she can’t have a little romantic fun. The last thing she expects when she comes home to Port Townsend, Washington, for her high school reunion is to be swept off her feet by blake McKenzie.

Once the town bad boy, Blake is now a prominent shipbuilder dedicated to helping local teens. When he asks Claire to talk to one of his boys about astronomy, he’s only thinking she might give direction to a troubled kid. He certainly never dreamed she’d inspire him – to fall in love. Now Blake is determined to show Claire that their future together is in the stars … if she’ll only open her eyes.

Author-friendly in spades – Kobo’s new WritingLife Rocks

The other day I received notice from KoboBooks that my new Writing Life account was ready.  I’d been excited by the recent news that Kobo would be rolling out a new, writer-friendly interface for authors wishing to publish eBook editions of their books, and eager to take a look.

I went right over to find out what Kobo meant by writer-friendly. Amazon’s interface is writer-friendly, as is Smashwords. Barnes and Noble’s, not so much , but I’m hoping for improvements there now that Microsoft has invested in B&N. If Writing Life made it as convenient to publish eBooks as Smashwords and Amazon, I’d be happy. More would definitely be a bonus.

I got much more!

Signup: The signup process was easy – it took me less than 5 minutes, and that included looking up my banking information.

Distribution: KoboBooks are distributed in over 170 countries!

Payment – Yes! I was hoping for payment through PayPal rather than checks by snail mail  – but I got even better. A bonus for Canadian (and I assume other non-USA) authors and publishers - Kobo pays by direct deposit to my Canadian bank account

Publishing my booksFast, Easy, and Smooth!

This is the easiest process for uploading ebooks files, pricing, choosing sales channels, and entering the book’s meta-data that I’ve ever used. Not only was it fast to get the data up there, with easy to use forms and very little waiting – the books were available for sale almost immediately. It was easy to opt out of DRM (see my blog about digital rights management) so that my readers don’t need to worry about being locked into one format.

Information on sales – Writing Life has a beautiful “Dashboard” that allows writers and publishers to see sales numbers and estimated dollars earned at a glance, and a quick link to the publishing daqta for all books in the account.

Kudos to Kobo for a slick, convenient interface, and a system that makes authors books available in the ePUB format worldwide, on excellent terms (Kobo asks that the contract terms be kept confidential, but I found them very fair).

Kobo Rocks!

Vanessa Grant romance novels newly released on KoboBooks
- DRMfree, samples available at KoboBooks

If You Loved Me (#1 in the Emma and Jamie series)
The Colors of Love (#2 in the Emma and Jamie series)
Storm – the Author’s Cut

New on All Romance eBooks

I’ve been busy this week getting some of my titles up on All Romance Ebooks, and I’ll be putting more up over the next few weeks. Visit All Romance eBooks and search for Vanessa Grant.

For great romances, and people who own – or have owned – more than one format of ereader, All Romance eBooks offers a wide selection of quality romances in a variety of formats – Mobipocket, ePub, Palm, iSolo, and Rocket.

My books on All Romance eBooks are all DRMfree. Whenever I have the option, I prefer to sell my books through channels that make it possible to offer them without DRM (digital rights management). I’ve had several eReaders over the last two decades, and I always look for books that are DRM free when I buy, because then I know that – thanks to Calibre – I’ll have no trouble converting my purchase to another format if I need to.

Have a great week!

Vanessa Grant


To DRM or not to DRM – with apologies to Hamlet!

To DRM or not to DRM… that is the question …  

Hopefully Shakespeare’s ghost will forgive me for mangling that line from Hamlet’s famous soliloquy!

(Note: This article has previously been posted on the PenWarriors blog)

A couple of weeks ago when I sent out a tweet announcing that all my eBooks are available in DRM-free editions from Amazon and Smashwords, someone asked for clarification. The subsequent conversation sent me on a hunt for clear descriptions of the DRM (Digital Rights Management) issue as it applies to eBooks. My aim in today’s blog is to give a brief, plain English explanation of Digital Rights Mangement (DRM), with links to more technical information for those who want to learn more.

What is Digital Rights Management?

  • “DRM technologies attempt to control use of digital media [ebooks, digital music files, computer software] by preventing access, copying or conversion to other formats by end users.” Calibre eBook management
  • When you buy an e-book with DRM you don’t really own it but have purchased the permission to use it in a manner dictated to you by the seller. DRM limits what you can do with e-books you have ‘bought’.” Calibre eBook management
  • For those who want the comprehensive, technical definition and history, see Wikipedia

Information About Digital Rights Management

  • Background – software and CDs: In the 1980s and 1990s digital rights technology was used on some computer software and music CDs in an attempt to stop piracy. This technology frequently caused legitimate users to experience computer problems because of the temperamental nature of the DRM control software, and also violated privacy in some instances. The problems experienced by blameless users of select Sony BMG CDs  resulted in the music industry giving up on DRM. The computer software industry also moved away from DRM to a “serial number” and “registration key” model because DRM not only made legitimate users furious, but it was found to be ineffective in stopping piracy.
  • DRM does not stop piracy: As early as 2003, HP Laboratories Cambridge reported “We conclude that given the current and foreseeable state of technology the content protection features of DRM are not effective at combating piracy.”
  • DRM and digital books: Despite the negative experience of the music and computer software industries, many traditional publishers use DRM on eBooks, although there is an increasing body of mainstream information indicating that although costly, it is not effective:

What DRM means to eBook readers

I first began reading eBooks in the 1990s when I purchased a Rocket eBook reader, and have owned a number of electronic reading devices since then. I quickly learned that when I buy a book with DRM technology, I might not be able to read that book on future devices I purchase.

That’s a problem for me. I love to reread favorite books, and I don’t want to have to pay over and over again for the same book. So whenever possible I choose to purchase DRM-Free versions of eBooks.

For more information on digital rights for readers, see

How can you tell if the book you want has DRM technology?

In The Real Cost of Free, Cory Doctorow reports that, “Apple, Audible, Sony and others have stitched up several digital distribution channels with mandatory DRM requirements, so copyright holders don’t get to choose to make their works available on equitable terms.”

However, many eBook sellers do allow copyright holders to choose whether books will be sold with, or without DRM, and a growing number sell only DRM-Free books. I’ve given a list below, and if you know of other sources for DRM-Free books, please comment and I’ll update the list.

Sources for DRM-free books

  • Project Gutenberg –free books in the public domain for multiple formats.
  • Smashwords – over 30,000 books, available in multiple formats – EPUB, Kindle, and others
  • Calibre Open Books – listings for DRM-Free eBooks. Follow links under titles to see formats available. If you are an author or publisher of DRM-Free eBooks and your books are not listed on Calibre’s site, you can add your books to their listings
  • BeWrite Books – all DRM-Free books in multiple formats
  • Baen – speculative fiction DRM-Free eBooks for multiple formats

Sources selling DRM and DRM-Free eBooks. Check to be sure which you’re getting.

  • Fictionwise.com – books labeled “multiformat” are DRM-Free and are available in multiple formats.
  • KoboBooks – see “Download options” in the book description, and look for the words DRM-Free
  • Amazon Kindle books – the method described on this Calibre page for checking if books are DRM-Free no longer works. If anyone knows how to tell if an Amazon book has DRM, please comment and I’ll update this post.

Converting eBooks from one format to another

Calibre’s free eBook library management application is the tool I use to convert DRM-Free books so that I can read them on my iPad AND my Kindle – and any other device I buy in future. It’s also a great program, the price is right (I do donate periodically because Calibre does a great job of updating its library of reading devices and it’s a great free service.) Information on converting is available at Calibre‘s website

A short post … NOT! LOL!

I intended to write a short post, less than 500 words, but I couldn’t manage it! Sorry for the length, but I hope this is useful to eBook readers and authors.

Vanessa

Vanessa Grant books available on Amazon
MultiFormat Vanessa Grant Books on Smashwords